October 2016

How to Have a Happy Halloween!

We get it: Halloween can be a hard holiday for specially-abled families! If you don’t live in a neighborhood, that means loading up in your van after every trick-or-treat stop. Not to mention how frustrating it can be to climb up curbs or make it to the front-door of a house with stairs!

But fear not! We’ve found the solution to the Halloween Horror!

Trunk-or-treating!

What is trunk-or-treating, you ask? Instead of going house to house on Halloween, lines of decorated cars assemble for trunk-or-treaters to peer into their trunks for some Halloween candy!

Because we believe fun should be accessible, here are some van decorating ideas for anyone wanting to decorate their own van for a trunk-or-treat!

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Having trouble figuring out what you can do to dress your kid up for Halloween? We’ve got that covered, too! Check out our Halloween Costume board on Pinterest >> https://www.pinterest.com/amsvans/happy-halloween/

Parenting a Specially-abled Child

Disabled boy in wheelchair surrounded by familyBeing a parent of a child that is specially-abled looks a lot like facing hard truths head on, being able to admit those truths to yourself, and finding support.

Jolene Philo, a published author and speaker, wrote an article about 11 things that she found helped her with the role of parenting a specially-abled child.

Here’s our own version of her advice:

Embrace the stress: It’s not going anywhere. And it’s better to acknowledge that it’s there. You don’t let the stress beat you, but you point it out for the sake of doing something about it.

Stress is a symptom of something else, so identify the source: It’s grief. In order to be a parent of a specially-abled child, you have to let yourself grieve. You feel a sense of loss — okay, now grieve. Give yourself the freedom and acceptance to grieve.

Deal with the elephant in the room — guilt: The hand your child was dealt is not your fault, but it feels like it. You are a good parent, even though you constantly blame yourself. Find someone you can trust to counsel you or someone that you can be open with to vent to. Get rid of that guilt!

Start asking for help: Be prepared for people to ask you what they can do for you — make mental notes of the things you know someone else could do without too much trouble, and don’t be afraid to ask them to do it!

You are not the sole caregiver: Step down from the role you’ve given yourself of “sole caregiver.” Although we know that you are probably the best at caring for your child, there are actual “caregivers” that have been trained specifically for taking care of your child. More than that, though, others can be educated more about taking care of specially-abled children and come alongside you to assist you in every day life!

wheelchair ipad attachmentForm a support system: You need people you can reach out to when life is getting hard or when you need a helping hand in the midst of juggling so much; you need a group of people that can encourage you and stay up to date on your life — it will make you feel like you aren’t alone!

Take care of yourself: Whether that’s cutting out space in your day for some you-time or eating well and exercising, it’s important to make sure that you are physically and emotionally healthy when parenting a specially-abled child.

Don’t be too proud for professional help: If you’ve admitted to stress, pinpointed the root of your stress, allowed yourself the freedom and grace to grieve, then admitting that counseling sessions might be a good idea shouldn’t be too hard for you. If these exercises above don’t seem to be enough, then there are always more outlets a therapist could offer you in order to reduce the stress in your life.

Our very own Dallas Crum, head of community relations and business development, opened up about life as a parent to two specially-abled children.

He was honest about the real fears that come with the territory. “I’m most afraid of the unknown. Will my daughter be able to have a relationship and get married? Will my wife and I ever be empty nesters? Will our daughter live that long? What kind of future does my son have? Will he be able to support himself one day? Will he be accepted socially? Will our marriage make it through this? Will I make it through this? No answers. Knowing more than the doctors you see. Endless therapy, unique diets, financial strain, countless visits to every type of “specialist” and every type of doctor you can think of. IEP’s. Fighting to get your child the coverage and services they need with insurance, the school system, Medicaid, doctors, therapy providers, etc…”

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So  we asked him if there’s anything that makes life easier in spite of the fear and struggles: “What makes it easier? There is no ‘what makes it easier.’ What I do have that keeps me going? Faith, Love, Hope. I love those kids. No matter what the outcome for them and our family is, I wouldn’t trade it or who they are. This is my family.

Lastly, we wanted to share some advice from one parent to another: “It’s ok to cry, it’s ok to talk about what could have been or what may never be, It’s ok to wonder how in the world you are going to take another step. I would tell them you will have doubts, you will question why, you will have unanswerable questions. You may doubt God, your Faith. I wish I could end with a high five and a, ‘Don’t worry! it will get better!’ the only problem with that is, It’s [crap]. Try not to listen to people who mean well but say things that hurt, cause more confusion and mixed emotions. They don’t understand… They are saying the cliché phrases that should never be said.”

Still, Dallas wanted to end with this very important tip on parenting a specially-abled child: “I can say though, whatever the outcome, it’s worth it. Even if I don’t get to see my baby girl grow up and get married, I will never trade a moment I am blessed to spend with her. Even if my son doesn’t progress to a level that he can function independently one day, He is my son and he is enough, no matter who he is.”

It’s worth it. It’s okay to grieve, and it’s important to admit to feeling stressed or guilty on top of making time to take care of yourself. But it’s worth it. And it’s possible.

Doggie Day – What You Might Not Know About Service Dogs

On October 14, AMS Vans is participating in disAbility Link’s Doggie Day event! This event will educate folks about service dogs, offer low-cost vaccinations for your service dog, and have fun activities and prizes for kids!
AccessibilityService dogs are a worth-while investment because they have, in fact, been proven to enhance the lives of their partners by making them feel more independent, which in turn boosts self-esteem and provides more opportunities to experience more things.
Specifically, service dogs provide the following assistance:
  • Unload laundry from dryer
  • Assist partner in loading laundry into top loading washing machine
  • Fetch wheelchair when it’s out of reach
  • Assist in clean up of house – pickup, carry, deposit designated items
  • Pay for purchases at high counters
  • Tug socks off without biting down on foot
  • Pull drapery cord to open or close drapes
  • Transfer assistance from wheelchair to van seat, bed, toilet or bathtub
  • Assist to walk step by step, brace between each step, from wheelchair to nearby seat
  • Call 911 on K-9 rescue phone, let emergency personnel into home and lead to partner’s location
  • Lie down on a person’s chest to produce a cough when suction machine is unavailable
  • Service Dogs can also help with veterans living with PTSD; they provide emotional support and can help people adjust back into the every day grind
More than that, service dogs provide companionship. They easily can become a part of the family!
Which is part of the reason why we are so excited to be a part of disAbilitiy Link’s Doggie Day! It’s a little known fact that wheelchair accessible vans actually benefit both humans and their service animals; wheelchair vans offer a more spacious area for a service dog to sit in, as well as an easier process for them to assist their partner in loading into a vehicle.
Bet you didn’t know that your furry friends were a part of the AMS  Vans family, too!
Are you in need of a service dog currently?