Wheelchair Accessible Vans

The Wheelchair Accessible Vans section spotlights wheelchair vans in the news. We’ll explain the handicap vehicle laws and regulations behind handicap parking placards, handicap parking spaces, handicap parking permits, and other topics pertaining to accessible vans and their users. Look for illumination on new wheelchair vans, used accessible vans and information about converting existing vans into handicap accessible vans.

Rear-entry wheelchair accessible vans

Rear-entry wheelchair accessible van benefits that deserve your attention

You’re thinking about purchasing a special needs vehicle. You ask yourself the question: What kind of van — rear-entry or side-entry — should I buy? Because knowing is half the battle, we’ll rundown the benefits of the rear-entry wheelchair access vehicle that make this a smart choice for adaptable mobility.

Wheelchair accessible vehicle technology has created some unique rear-entry access designs. When you get a quick look at the primary elements of the rear-entry van, you might decide that this is a special needs vehicle worth owning. Continue reading

Side-entry wheelchair accessible vans

Why side-entry wheelchair accessible vans are creating a buzz in mobility

Individuals with special needs who are in the market for a new vehicle have a choice to make — rear-entry or side-entry. While the answer depends on your unique abilities, you should know that the side-entry wheelchair accessible is trending right now. Here’s more on what all the buzz is about in the world of adaptable mobility.

Side-entry wheelchair accessible van technology is giving special needs individuals travel possibilities that they never considered before. The configuration elements of this popular conversion style might just get your attention enough to make you pull out your wallet. Continue reading

Wheelchair accessible van rentals

AMS Vans makes wheelchair accessible van rentals easy and affordable

Everyone gets cases of cabin fever from time to time. But just the thought of renting a wheelchair accessible van — with the hassles of paperwork and inevitable expense — can be enough to keep you from making a move. That’s why AMS Vans has streamlined the process and made the whole thing remarkably affordable.

Life is tough when everything is going well. The process of renting an adaptable mobility van shouldn’t make things any harder — especially when you get the urge to get out of the house and see the world. But AMS Vans has solved the challenges of the hassle-free van rental. Continue reading

Wheelchair Vans with Lifts

What does the Ford Transit van with mobility conversion do better than any other wheelchair accessible vehicle?

Most wheelchair accessible vehicles do just one or two things very well. Some are known for a great deal of interior room. Others offer multiple configurations for versatile adaptations. And, some mobility conversions boast handling and maneuverability. But the Ford Transit van can do it all.  

Combination of style and substance: Unique features that now come standard

Perhaps the most critical consideration for any full-size wheelchair conversion van is its versatility. The new Ford transit van has been reconsidered and reconfigured to meet a variety of transportation possibilities. Continue reading

Parenting a Specially-abled Child

Disabled boy in wheelchair surrounded by familyBeing a parent of a child that is specially-abled looks a lot like facing hard truths head on, being able to admit those truths to yourself, and finding support.

Jolene Philo, a published author and speaker, wrote an article about 11 things that she found helped her with the role of parenting a specially-abled child.

Here’s our own version of her advice:

Embrace the stress: It’s not going anywhere. And it’s better to acknowledge that it’s there. You don’t let the stress beat you, but you point it out for the sake of doing something about it.

Stress is a symptom of something else, so identify the source: It’s grief. In order to be a parent of a specially-abled child, you have to let yourself grieve. You feel a sense of loss — okay, now grieve. Give yourself the freedom and acceptance to grieve.

Deal with the elephant in the room — guilt: The hand your child was dealt is not your fault, but it feels like it. You are a good parent, even though you constantly blame yourself. Find someone you can trust to counsel you or someone that you can be open with to vent to. Get rid of that guilt!

Start asking for help: Be prepared for people to ask you what they can do for you — make mental notes of the things you know someone else could do without too much trouble, and don’t be afraid to ask them to do it!

You are not the sole caregiver: Step down from the role you’ve given yourself of “sole caregiver.” Although we know that you are probably the best at caring for your child, there are actual “caregivers” that have been trained specifically for taking care of your child. More than that, though, others can be educated more about taking care of specially-abled children and come alongside you to assist you in every day life!

wheelchair ipad attachmentForm a support system: You need people you can reach out to when life is getting hard or when you need a helping hand in the midst of juggling so much; you need a group of people that can encourage you and stay up to date on your life — it will make you feel like you aren’t alone!

Take care of yourself: Whether that’s cutting out space in your day for some you-time or eating well and exercising, it’s important to make sure that you are physically and emotionally healthy when parenting a specially-abled child.

Don’t be too proud for professional help: If you’ve admitted to stress, pinpointed the root of your stress, allowed yourself the freedom and grace to grieve, then admitting that counseling sessions might be a good idea shouldn’t be too hard for you. If these exercises above don’t seem to be enough, then there are always more outlets a therapist could offer you in order to reduce the stress in your life.

Our very own Dallas Crum, head of community relations and business development, opened up about life as a parent to two specially-abled children.

He was honest about the real fears that come with the territory. “I’m most afraid of the unknown. Will my daughter be able to have a relationship and get married? Will my wife and I ever be empty nesters? Will our daughter live that long? What kind of future does my son have? Will he be able to support himself one day? Will he be accepted socially? Will our marriage make it through this? Will I make it through this? No answers. Knowing more than the doctors you see. Endless therapy, unique diets, financial strain, countless visits to every type of “specialist” and every type of doctor you can think of. IEP’s. Fighting to get your child the coverage and services they need with insurance, the school system, Medicaid, doctors, therapy providers, etc…”

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So  we asked him if there’s anything that makes life easier in spite of the fear and struggles: “What makes it easier? There is no ‘what makes it easier.’ What I do have that keeps me going? Faith, Love, Hope. I love those kids. No matter what the outcome for them and our family is, I wouldn’t trade it or who they are. This is my family.

Lastly, we wanted to share some advice from one parent to another: “It’s ok to cry, it’s ok to talk about what could have been or what may never be, It’s ok to wonder how in the world you are going to take another step. I would tell them you will have doubts, you will question why, you will have unanswerable questions. You may doubt God, your Faith. I wish I could end with a high five and a, ‘Don’t worry! it will get better!’ the only problem with that is, It’s [crap]. Try not to listen to people who mean well but say things that hurt, cause more confusion and mixed emotions. They don’t understand… They are saying the cliché phrases that should never be said.”

Still, Dallas wanted to end with this very important tip on parenting a specially-abled child: “I can say though, whatever the outcome, it’s worth it. Even if I don’t get to see my baby girl grow up and get married, I will never trade a moment I am blessed to spend with her. Even if my son doesn’t progress to a level that he can function independently one day, He is my son and he is enough, no matter who he is.”

It’s worth it. It’s okay to grieve, and it’s important to admit to feeling stressed or guilty on top of making time to take care of yourself. But it’s worth it. And it’s possible.

Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

September is National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month. 17,000 new cases of Spinal Cord Injuries are documented every year in the US alone; in this country today, 200,000 people live with a spinal cord injury (SCI), and someone is paralyzed every 48 seconds.

X-ray image of the vertebral column. Doctors consult over an X-ray.

48 seconds and a life is forever changed. Parents, daughters, college athletes, up and coming Marine Corps officers, co-workers, the person sitting next to you in traffic– SCI shows no partiality to where someone is in life or where they want to be headed.
Vehicle accidents are at the top of the list when it comes to leading causes of SCI, but other causes include: falling, sport injuries, or acts of violence.
In the past year, 19 customers have purchased a wheelchair van from AMS Vans due to a spinal cord injury.
The United Spinal Association is, however, fighting for the lives of those living with spinal cord injuries; they believe in obtaining affordable medical equipment and insurance, housing, transportation, ways that people with SCI can live independently, and numerous other benefits that can be reached through donations and awareness.
Of course, funds and awareness will also help fuel the big over-arching goal: medical research and scientific findings.
To learn more about Spinal Cord Injuries, SCI Awareness Month, and ways to get involved or donate, check out https://www.unitedspinal.org/september-is-national-spinal-cord-injury-awareness-month-2/.

8 Tips on How To Travel With Your Handicap Van

women in van2Headed out of town for the holiday weekend? Well we know just how exciting AND nerve racking adventures can be for our AMS family! That’s why we decided to come up with our own
kind of vacation itinerary for those of us who are adventuring in handicap vans!
 
PLAN AHEAD: Common sense, right? Well sometimes a “rough idea” of what you’ll be doing over the weekend just isn’t going to cut it. Figure out exactly what you are going to do, where you want to stay, what dinner reservations you might want to make or tours you might want to book. Figure it all out so that you can start planning how much time it will take you to do all the things that you want to do.
System Check: Make sure all of your equipment is in good shape before you hit the road! This includes your AMS Vans, Inc. ramps! It’s better to be safe and know what might need to be updated in your wheelchair accessible van before you head out!
 
How to Pack: Pack light, but bring a day bag! You never know what you’re going to end up getting into and if you may need a change of clothes, some extra food, emergency equipment, and phone chargers. Also be sure to keep your wheelchair equipment information close by! In your van or in your bag!
 
For When You Feel Like You’re A Fish Swimming Upstream: Adventuring around an area commonly visited by crowds of tourists? Make a mental note that morning that it might take you a little bit longer to wheel through the business! Plan to give yourself some extra time to breathe and navigate through all of the people!
Check the weather before booking a thing: The last thing anyone wants is to plan a vacation during some not-so-sunny, weather! Unexpected bad weather can be especially frustrating, though, if you have trouble walking or are scooting around everywhere on wheels. Check the weather schedule for wherever you’re going on the days that you want to get away!
It’s okay to say “NO”: Feeling a little bit more tired than your accompanying adventurers? It’s OKAY to say NO to something if you need a rest. We know you don’t want to miss out, but you’re allowed to be tired, and you’re allowed to say you need rest! AND it’s okay to say you just can’t do something! You and your health come FIRST.
You Do You: Do what you’re comfortable with! You shouldn’t feel pressured to do anything or keep up with a certain pace! It is vacation after all!
Try New Things: Don’t be afraid to get out there and live a little!! Just be sure you’ve brought precautionary items, that you’ve carved out enough time for the new adventure, and that there are no limitations you might end up having to face!