Wheelchair Blog from AMS Vans

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A physical disability presents unique challenges for the individual, the family and the caregivers. Our wheelchair blog is here to empower all of you with tips, trends in wheelchair technology, wheelchair news, inspiring stories, insightful interviews, medical breakthroughs, helpful links, the latest in adaptive products, disability news, upcoming events and, of course, information about AMS Vans' wheelchair accessible vehicles. We focus on anything and everything that enriches your life and makes it easier.

Buying a handicap accessible van is a defining moment in the life of an individual who wants manageable mobility beyond the wheelchair. We have handicap vans for sale, and we want to ensure the process—from the moment it begins—is as smooth as possible. When you purchase a wheelchair van from us, the process never truly ends, because you become part of the AMS family. Just like family, we stay in touch and care about your happiness.

We'd love to hear from you—even if it's just to say "hello!" Your thoughts matter, so take time to comment on the articles that interest you, inspire you, or provoke you. Every question, suggestion or concern you share with us helps us make our wheelchair blog better and more useful for all our readers. At AMS Vans, we want to get to know you, and we want you to get to know us!

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Bird Box Explained: Is the Janet Tucker School for the Blind a Real Place?

The Netflix film Birdbox debuted earlier this year and was a massive hit for the streaming service. The film stars Sandra Bullock as a mother trying to transport her two children through a post-apocalyptic wasteland while unable to use the power of sight.

One of the most prominent features of the film’s final act was a location known as the Janet Tucker School for the Blind. Watching the film may lead viewers to question whether or not the film’s climactic location exists in real life.

Let’s take a closer look at what happened in the film Birdbox and whether or not the school featured at the end of the film actually exists.

Synopsis

The story of Birdbox unfolds in a non-linear format. Sandra Bullock plays Marjorie, a reluctant mom who’s expecting a baby. As her sister drives her home from a doctor’s appointment, an unseen monster begins causing people to immediately commit suicide upon seeing it.

The only way to avoid it is to not look at it – effectively blinding yourself. The survivors have to get creative to avoid seeing the monster. Some wear blindfolds or keep their eyes closed. Others black out the windows of a car when they have to travel.

Marjorie ends up barricaded in a house with multiple strangers. The story flashes back and forth between that and the present day, where Marjorie transports two children from their hideout to a place they’ve heard about through a transistor radio. Along the way we see her resolve tested.

The Janet Tucker School for the Blind

Marjorie is able to successfully shield the eyes of her and her children from the monster. They arrive at their final destination: Janet Tucker’s School for the Blind. The final irony of the film is that the differently abled are now advantaged in this new society in which these horrible monsters terrorize those with the ability to see.

It’s the closest thing a story like this could get to a happy ending. The Janet Tucker School for the Blind is a sanctuary for Marjorie and her two children. It’s full of flowers, grass, singing birds, and smiling, happy people.

It’s a somewhat upbeat ending for a film that up until that point had been unceasingly bleak.

Is the Janet Tucker School for the Blind a Real Place?

In the film, the Janet Tucker School for the Blind is depicted as being in the middle of a forest, near the end of a long and winding river. It appears to be significantly separated from society. There are no cities or major metropolitan areas anywhere near it, making it a great location for the story’s hero to rest after spending the entire film on the run or in hiding from the monsters.

The film never provides an exact location for Janet Tucker’s School for the Blind, though the film itself takes place in northern California. By all accounts, it is not a real school. It appears to have been invented strictly for the purpose of the film. It does not exist in the novel – one of the several major differences between the film and the book.

Summary

Birdbox was a major hit with a twist ending that portrayed the disabled in a positive light. While the film had plenty of scares leading up to that point, it ended happily with the main character and her kids seeking refuge at the Janet Tucker School for the Blind.

While the Janet Tucker School for the Blind depicted a positive, happy environment for the blind children to learn and grow and the school as it existed in the film was located somewhere in the forests of northern California, the school does not exist in real life. It was invented as a plot device for the film.

New Drug Gives Growth and New Life To Girl With No Bones

Janelly Martnez-Amador was given the gift of life just when doctors had prepared her parents for what the doctors believed was inevitable. The adorable little girl was born with a severe form of hypophosphatasia, a genetic disorder that prevents skeletal mineralization. When things looked hopeless, a clinical trial of a new drug turned her situation around.

Nurses prepared Janelly for a photo session at the hospital, removing her tubes and dressing her in a cute pink outfit so that her parents could have a keepsake of their baby girl without all the medical equipment that was sustaining her life.  Janelly’s rare form of hypophosphatasia meant that she didn’t have the ribs to support breathing, and her parents were faced with the decision of continuing life-sustaining intervention, or letting their little girl go.

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Teen with Spina Bifida Benefits from Advanced Hip Surgery

“I was told that what’s going to happen is going to happen, and there’s no point in trying to prevent anything.”

Amanda Geier said this was the medical advice she received regarding her daughter Samantha, who has spina bifida. After hearing the medical opinion, Geier took on a different attitude than what had been suggested. She says, “You learn to fight for your kid to be able to do things she wants to do.”

Samantha Geier has a condition known as spina bifida, which happens when the spinal cord or the vertebrae surrounding it do not correctly or completely form, which results in damaged nerves and muscle weakness. Samantha received her first operation when she was just six weeks old at the Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego. Now she is 16 years old and has had a number of surgeries.

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Aimee Copeland Is World’s First to Use State-of-the-Art Bionic Hands

Just over a year ago, Aimee Copeland captured the world’s attention after a zip-lining accident left her with a deep gash and a flesh-eating bacteria. To save her life, the University of West Georgia graduate student underwent multiple amputations to stop the infection. Now, thanks to the help of the latest technology in prosthetics, she can chop vegetables, pick up Skittles and fix her hair on her own.

The “i-limb ultra revolution” bionic hands are made by Touch Bionics, and run a hefty $120,000 each. The hands can be controlled remotely with an iPad application and a blue-tooth connection. According to a spokesperson for the company, the “bioism” software can be downloaded to an iPhone or iPod, as well.

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